Technology Minor in Business

Recently, I was asked to write a short "Q&A" summary on Marian's Business Technology Minor for our Adult Program. The link between technology and business is undeniable. I advise anyone majoring in a field such as Business Administration, Accounting, Finance, or Marketing to take as many computer courses as they can. I often tell my students that you never know when something that you learned somewhere may come in handy. Also, working with computers teaches a way of thinking that can be a great asset in business problem solving. You don't have to have an "IT" degree but you should understand the basics and be able to apply them to your discipline. The more experience the better!

Why pursue a concentration in Business Technology?

Employers increasingly are demanding graduates that understand and can effectively apply technology to business problems. No matter what your profession, you should consider using computers and information technology part of your job. A Business Technology concentration combined with an Accounting, Management, or Marketing major makes a great combination in today’s job market!

Would this concentration be beneficial in today’s economic downward spiral?

Yes, because information technology is one area that will not be decreasing in importance. Companies may be cutting back in some areas but skilled professionals who understand both business principles and information technology will always be in demand.

What doors would be opened? What jobs would be available?

A Business Technology concentration can give Marian graduates a competitive edge. Some jobs open to those who have a Business degree with a technology concentration include:

Systems Analyst
IT Consultant
Database Specialist
Application Developer
Trainer
Information Security Manager

and of course any “traditional” positions in Accounting, Management, or Marketing.

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